IT’S BEEN A GREAT ONE

From campaign wins to vital new services, you helped make last year our biggest yet. Want to see what we achieved together?

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OUR IMPACT

2021-2022

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Three people with baloons, smiling.

WHAT A YEAR

WHAT A YEAR

It’s hard to believe we’re at the end of another year dominated by coronavirus. Beat, and those we support, have faced enormous challenges — rising numbers of people with eating disorders, and an NHS stretched to breaking point.

But thanks to our incredible community, we rose to the occasion.

Two runners wearing Beat Eating Disorders running gear.

As waiting lists grew, we kept people afloat. As more people found themselves caring for a loved one, we provided a place to turn.

We fought harmful policy, pushed for better training, and supported more people than ever. We increased understanding of eating disorders through virtual conferences, community work and our annual Eating Disorders Awareness Week.

None of this would have been possible without you.

So thank you.

A lady wearing a Beat Eating Disorders t-shirt

The strides we made over the last year

we made with you beside us.

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This report is a snapshot of what we’ve achieved together.

We hope you feel as proud as we do.

OUR YEAR

BY THE

NUMBERS

Icon of a rosette

98%

would recommend Beat

A lady in Beat Eating Disorders running gear competing in the Great North Run.
Icon of a person talking on a helpline

Our helpline is now open

91 Hours

a week

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Our services helped people

127,705

times

An icon of twelve people An icon of nine people

Meanwhile

1,401

people crafted, skydived, trekked, baked and ran to raise

£790,000

"What about
donations?"

Glad you asked.

This year, you donated a staggering...

£1,130,305

With every penny, we'll build a future free from eating disorders

CHANGING

TIMES.

NEW

SERVICES.

A young woman wearing a Beat Eating Disorders t-shirt.

As we emerged from lockdown, eating disorder services were oversubscribed and underfunded. They simply didn’t have spaces for everyone who needed them.

So how did we plug the gap?

A young man running in Beat Eating Disorders running gear.

With 5
support
programmes

Programmes for people with different diagnoses, or no diagnosis

Programmes for people who can’t access treatment

Programmes for anyone who needs a safe space to talk

01.
Momentum

Momentum uses guided self-help to support people with binge eating disorder in their journey towards a healthier relationship with food.

“I would absolutely recommend the programme. It helped me understand what I was going through.“

02.
Motivate

Motivate keeps people afloat as they wait for clinical treatment, encouraging them to focus on the hope of recovery.

“Before Motivate, I felt incredibly desperate. This programme gave me much-needed support I wasn’t getting elsewhere.“

03.
Bolster

Bolster recognises that there’s no such thing as “not ill enough” for support, helping those without a formal diagnosis.

“I would’ve been stuck where I was without this. The calls motivated me and I’d recommend them to anyone.“

04.
Synergy

Synergy helps young people and their loved ones face the eating disorder together, giving the whole family a way forward.

“We were really struggling to find any hope or positive way forward. We now have skills to keep our amazing daughter well. We’re looking forward to her future.“

05.
Nexus

Nexus offers a safe and supportive space for those caring for someone with an eating disorder.

“I’m using these phone calls, so that I’m well and able to look after myself too.“

It’s a helpless and heart-breaking feeling to watch a loved one struggle with an eating disorder.

So we also developed other services to help those who help.

SOLACE offers video-based peer-support for anyone caring for someone with an eating disorder. It evolved, with participants discussing boundaries and self-care over eight weeks.

Our ‘Eating Disorders: Support For the Frontline' conference returned,

bringing 584 people together. This included those caring for a loved one and frontline workers who shared ideas and advice.

An icon style graphic of many people. An icon style graphic of many people.

And it was at Frontline that we launched POD (Peer support and Online Development),

a brand-new platform for anyone caring for someone with an eating disorder.

It combines training, peer support, and other resources in one easy-to-navigate space.

Peer support and Online Development logo

3,511

have joined POD since it launched in November 2021

“My daughter was recently diagnosed with anorexia nervosa. I knew nothing about how to manage this. I have learnt so much from POD, and have been given the tools to support my daughter in her recovery.“

EMPOWERING

OUR DOCTORS

A photograph of two doctors smiling.

On average, medical schools offered under two hours of training on eating disorders.

A fifth provided none at all.

So we worked closely with experts to develop proper training for medical students.

We rounded off a year of conversations with UK medical schools by focusing on better training for Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2022

– and we had an amazing response.

21

medical schools have introduced or will soon introduce in-depth training

85%

of UK medical schools have engaged with us

Our supporters
made all the
difference

During Eating Disorders Awareness Week:

An icon of a hand dropping money

21

medical schools
stepped up

You made

1,400

appeals to politicians

And donated over

£22,500

5,619

signed our open letter

ADD YOUR NAME

You fundraised over

£39,000

We also developed training for GPs and nurses.

Rolling out all three training courses will be a huge part of our work this year.

Two runners wearing Beat Eating Disorders running gear showing off medals.

LAYING THE

GROUNDWORK

FOR CHANGE

Some of the most important progress happens slowly. The work we’re doing now will make a huge difference in the future.

Over the last year, we...

An icon of a megaphone…highlighted inconsistencies in
improvements to Welsh services

An icon of two people talking…called for proper funding of eating disorder research,
and engaged with the people who make it happen

An icon of two people with placards…campaigned for inclusion of eating disorders in a major survey about adult mental health in England

EXPANDING

OUR REACH

WE’RE THE UK’S EATING DISORDER CHARITY.
And we must live up to that name – we’re for everyone, everywhere.

So this year we expanded our reach in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. We launched nations-specific Helplines. And we spread our message through our champions of change.

Making our mark
in Northern Ireland

In December 2020, we welcomed our
first national officer for Northern Ireland.

Nicola Armstrong, National Officer for NI

HER
FIRST
STEP?

Nicola Armstrong, National Officer for NI

Addressing the draft Mental Health Strategy.
This was a huge opportunity to make eating disorder services better for people in Northern Ireland.

Thanks in part to our campaign, the final Mental Health Strategy made ambitious proposals. Including...

01.

Immediate referral for anyone presenting with an eating disorder

02.

More treatment options in the community – Mental Health Hubs, schools-based CAMHS services, and intensive outpatient services

03.

Better connections between specialist eating disorder teams and general mental health services

Now we need to see it funded.

So our campaigners stepped up.

91

campaigners sent 450 letters calling for the Executive to allocate funding for the first three years of the Mental Health Strategy.

They reached

85/90

Members of the Legislative Assembly,
in 17 out of 18 constituencies.

AND MEMBERS
ARE LISTENING

So far,
we’ve had

19

direct responses from MLAs committing their support, including the Ministers for Finance and Health.

And MLAs have tabled

16

questions about eating disorders.

It’s been a great first year, and we’ll make sure eating disorders stay firmly on the political agenda.

TAKE ME TO NORTHERN IRELAND

Paving the way
in Wales

In 2018, the Welsh government commissioned an independent review of eating disorder services in Wales. It set out a vision for a “world-class” service – and we set out to hold the government to that vision.

We followed their progress closely and held them to account in our 3 Years On report. How? By calling for…

01.

A new framework for eating disorder services, focused on early intervention and prevention, support for families and other carers, and investment in frontline workers

02.

A permanent National Clinical Lead for Eating Disorders

03.

People with lived experience of eating disorders to be formally involved with developing and evaluating eating disorder services

While there’s still progress to be made, we’ve seen promising things.

During Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2022,

Members of Senedd debated this report and the future of eating disorder services in Wales.

They mentioned Beat

30 times.

11

parliamentary questions about eating disorders have been put to the Deputy Minister for Mental Health and Wellbeing by Members of Senedd.

The government have awarded over

£70,000

to Beat to help fund our Helpline and spaces on two of our support programmes, Nexus and SharED.

When Beat tells me, 'You know what? The frameworks we currently have aren’t doing it for us, we need to build something new', it’s a clear message to us that we need to move in that direction."

- Rhun ap Iorwerth, Deputy Leader of Plaid Cymru

OUR WORK IN WALES
A map of Scotland

Great strides in Scotland

This year, the Scottish government gave us a whopping £219,000 in funding. That meant we could roll out our support programmes in almost every part of the country.

We also partnered with the Church of Scotland Guild. As their members ran brilliant fundraisers for Beat, we helped people in local communities better understand eating disorders. So far, 18 volunteers have spoken about their own experiences to 61 Guilds across Scotland.

"[After the volunteer’s talk] one of our members felt able to share her family's difficulties with her own granddaughter... like all of us, [she] was left with a real sense of hope for the future."

― Church of Scotland Guild member

Our campaign to increase medical training

on eating disorders was a huge success:

ALL 4

Scottish medical schools have agreed to implement the training

And during Eating Disorders Awareness Week, MSPs mentioned Beat

34 times

in parliament

SEE MORE IN SCOTLAND

HERE'S TO

OUR

GROWING

COMMUNITY

With big names on board, our voice grew louder.

And we want to say thank you.

A photograph of Emma Thompson and Gaia Wise

"Beat is the most wonderful organisation. because there’s a lot of stigma attached to these disorders and Beat helps to undo that and provides a safe space in which people can talk, help each other, learn and recover. So I’m proud and happy to support it with all my heart."

― Emma Thompson

Thank you to actor Emma Thompson and her daughter Gaia Wise

“Having delivered Beat's medical training in Glasgow, and received positive feedback from students ― I’m keen to develop it further. As a Trustee and Chair of Beat's Clinical Advisory Group, I’m also delighted to be part of the ongoing work to improve education and training for all health professionals.

― Dr Stephen Anderson

A photograph of Dr Stephen Anderson

Thank you to consultant psychiatrist, Dr Stephen Anderson

A photograph of Shareefa J

“I’m supporting Beat because I believe we need to destigmatise the conversation around eating disorders and open up the conversation to people of all ages and backgrounds.“

― Shareefa J.

Thank you to body positivity model, Shareefa

“We need to make people aware that men can have eating disorders too. We need to take away the shame and stigma.“

― John Whaite

A photograph of John White

Thank you to star baker, John Whaite

And thanks to

YOU

Thank you for campaigning, volunteering, donating, fundraising and sharing your stories.

Together, we changed lives.

SO

WHAT'S

NEXT?

Two people wearing walking and climbing gear and a Beat Eating Disorders t-shirt.

We say goodbye to the past year and look to the coming one as more and more people turn to us for help.

An icon of a graph showing things going up.

We continue to expand our reach, increasing understanding of eating disorders across the UK

An icon signifying workflow.

We adapt and add to our services, to meet the changing needs of those we support

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And we keep holding the government and healthcare services to account

We hope that you’ll join us.

I'LL BE THERE

Want your own copy?

Check out this planet-pleasing PDF of our impact report.

READ ME

BEAT WOULD ALSO LIKE TO THANK...

Two women having a hug.
  • AWEDSIG
  • The Aviva Foundation
  • City Bridge Trust
  • Department of Health
  • and Social Care
  • Edward Gostling
  • Charitable Foundation
  • Former EMS
  • Fuller Endowment Fund
  • John Armitage Charitable Trust
  • John Wiley and Sons London Community
  • London Community Response Fund
  • Mazar’s Charity
  • Orri
  • PF Charitable Trust
  • PHJ Wills Charitable Trust
  • Sir Halley Stewart
  • Stone Family Foundation
  • SWAN
  • Upstart Foundation
  • Vogelgezang Foundation
  • Wales Mental Health Network
  • Young Scot
  • And our partners in the NHS
` Children in Need Logo The Department for Digital Culture Media and Sport National Lottery Community Fund Logo
Garfield Western Fund Logo John Ellerman Foundation Logo Scottish Government Logo Leathersellers Company Charitable Fund Logo Welsh Government Funded Logo The Community Foundation of Northern Ireland Logo Oak Foundation Logo The Health Foundation Logo

www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk

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